Charity a driving force for Milford golf business

MILFORD — Dan Roland is sales manager at I.G. Burton in Milford by day and CEO of his golf company at home by night.

Dan Roland founded Sniper Putters in 2010. (Submitted)

Dan Roland founded Sniper Putters in 2010. (Submitted)

“I tried to become a tour pro,” Mr. Roland said. “I played in a few mini-tours and Monday qualifiers but never could get over the hump.”

He said he wasn’t achieving any success with any of the putters he was using, so in 2010 he founded Sniper Putters, as the golf equipment company sells unique putters that appeal to every golfer.

“We do not use inserts for our putter face and we use stepless shafts to maximize the feedback and feel when you make contact with the ball,” Mr. Roland said.

“Our cross hairs alignment gives you the lateral and horizontal alignment making sure you are square at address leaving you with one simple task, take it straight back and straight through.

“This gives you the confidence to eliminate or reduce your three putts and make more pars and birdies,” Mr. Roland added.

The products are not currently in stores, but orders can be made through sniperputters.com.

Every business owner hopes their company makes as much money as possible. Mr. Roland shares the same sentiment, but through his Make Your Mark campaign, whose objective is to raise funds for military families. he believes the charity means much more.

Dan Roland’s products are not currently in stores, but orders can be made through sniperputters.com.

Dan Roland’s products are not currently in stores, but orders can be made through sniperputters.com.

“I created a special ball marker,” Mr. Roland said. “I hope to hit the $1 million mark and then raise the bar to achieving the sale of perhaps 10 million markers to be able to provide funds to the families of men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.”

The commemorative medallion ball markers cost $9.95 for the size of a quarter or $12.95 for a half-dollar size.

The campaign donates 50 percent of the proceeds to military-related charities, including the Chris Kyle Frog Foundation, Wounded Warriors, Folds of Honor or a registered military charity of one’s choosing.

The “Make Your Mark” medallion is both a keepsake and a reminder of the men and women who put their lives on the line each and every day serving our country.

“With the ball maker I don’t want them in retail stores,” Mr. Roland said. “I want as much money as I can so I can give them to the charities. I really want to sell the putters, but the markers are the number one priority.”

Mr. Roland said the campaign launched about a week ago, and he’s sold about 100 units already.

“We seem to be getting at our peak,” Mr. Roland said. “I did a radio interview and people started calling in instantly.”

He said it was always his intention to have a military connection with his business.

“As long as I’m in charge, this campaign will always be a part of this company,” Mr. Roland said.

“I always wanted to support our troops because I appreciate all that they do for this country. When September 11th happened that really hit home for me.”

“Every time I see a soldier in uniform I go over and shake their hands and just thank them for their services,” Mr. Roland added.
Mr. Roland said people don’t have be a golfer to support the cause.

“The marker may be purchased as a gift item or even left behind at a restaurant for a waiter or waitress,” he said. “It’s a small token of appreciation to those that serve our country.”

The other campaign, Putt Through, which is an extension of Mark Your Mark, donates 50 percent of any sale to charity.

Even though Mr. Roland gets little sleep between balancing both jobs, he believes it will all be worth it in the long run.

“I’m just a small guy,” Mr. Roland said. “I would love to see my business take off.

“If it does, I hope jobs are created within my company, which will help a lot of people. I just want to keep adding jobs and build my business.”

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