BEST BETS: Bloodsworth carrying a tune for local music

Local band Big Dipper will perform at the fourth annual History, Heritage and Hops craft brew festival May 5 on Loockerman Street in Dover. Members are, from left, Scott Bloodsworth, Kevin Brock, Chad Hudson and Guy Farmer. (Submitted photo)

Already busy with his own musical pursuits, Scott Bloodsworth is making sure other area artists get their time in the spotlight as well.

Mr. Bloodsworth, whose Big Dipper band will play for this year’s History, Heritage and Hops festival along Loockerman Street in Dover following Dover Days on May 5, has also hosted and produced “Live at Scooter’s,” an internet show that highlights local groups, for almost three years.

“There’s a plethora of amazing talent in this area who write their own music that don’t get a chance to perform it as much as they would like,” he said. “This helps give them the opportunity.”

The 32-year-old Georgetown resident and Harrington native, whose day job consists of being a paraprofessional at the Kent County Community School in Dover, starting playing music when he was 15 years old.

“I was very fortunate to meet top-notch musicians at a young age and I learned how to be in bands. I learned a lot through them,” he said.

Years of playing in local cover bands such as Fish Whistle, Monkey Paw and Rag Top followed. After 15 years, he took a break from the cover scene when his wife became pregnant with his son Dillon, yet he still contributed to local music.

“I was just looking to regroup. While I was playing in local cover bands on Delmarva, I was writing and recording music just for my own enjoyment and I realized my iTunes list of songs was a lot longer than I thought,” he said.

So he formed the Scott Bloodsworth Band, which performed original and cover tunes at public events and theaters.

The urge to get more original music out to the public stayed with him and he longed to get to do something that would benefit other local musicians.

He knew of Dover’s Digital Street Studios, which was producing a weekly music show on the internet, similar to what he had mind. However, that show ended upon the death of host Ricky Beck.

Mr. Bloodsworth reached out to Digital Street co-owner Kevin Nemith for some pointers and recruited area bands for “Live at Scooter’s”.

“The live performance broadcasts have been very well received. I almost feel like it’s been my calling to do this,” he said.

Those live performances run when bands are available with his weekly shows showcasing audio tracks from bands not just on Delmarva.

“I’ve had people find me from Colorado, Arizona and Tennessee. They’ve sent me their stuff and I’ve played their music,” he said.

That show can be found every Wednesday at 8 p.m. at scottbloodsworth.com/live-scooter-s or by searching “Live at Scooter’s” on Facebook and Scott Bloodsworth on YouTube.

He has also added a show that spotlights area cover bands as well.

The Georgetown studio, which serves as the broadcast venue for the show, was the impetus for starting Big Dipper.

“Chad Hudson, who was my old guitar player in Rag Top, wanted to record a song he wrote. We reconnected and sort of picked up where we left off,” Mr. Bloodsworth said.

The two brought in old friends Guy Farmer on bass and Kevin Brock on drums to play and the four threw around ideas for more songs and are now working on a full album.

Having formed last summer, History, Heritage and Hops will be the band’s second performance. Mr. Bloodsworth describes Big Dipper’s sound as AC/DC and Led Zeppelin meets country’s Chris Stapleton.

“It’s a no-frills classic rock sound,” he said.

He’s also in another area band The Wet Bandits, which has more of a blues take. He joined them on steel guitar in December.

Along with Mr. Bloodsworth, that band includes Dave Nickolson on guitar and vocals, Mike Welch on bass, Doug Dennison on harmonica and vocals and Corey Lucas on drums.

“I am very blessed at this stage of my life to be creating and performing music with such great people,” he said.

Big Dipper’s set at History, Heritage and Hops runs from 4:45 to 6 p.m. and Mr. Bloodsworth promises a set of originals and covers from the likes of Eric Clapton, Pink Floyd, Aerosmith and more.

The event, which lasts from 3 to 9 p.m., kicks off with the Maryland-based Americana band The Susquehanna Floods and ends with headliner Mike Hines and The Look.

History, Heritage and Hops will take place May 5 on Loockerman Street in Dover. (Submitted photo)

The fourth annual History, Heritage, & Hops craft brew festival, produced by Destination Downtown Dover, is a family-friendly event that includes the downtown restaurants, food trucks and local breweries.

Proceeds fund beautification projects for downtown Dover. This year’s event will help bring thousands of flowers to the Loockerman Street corridor.

Event admission is free and individual drink tickets are $5 for a full pour of beer, wine, cider, mead or spirits.

An unlimited pour bracelet good for beer, cider and mead is available for $47 and can be purchased the day of the event.

Sixteen alcohol vendors will be on hand, including 16 Mile, Blue Earl, Mispillion River, Crooked Hammock and Painted Stave.

Eight food and dessert trucks will be there, along with face painting, video games, magic and more.

Dover’s Little School will host a free children’s area with activities as well.

For questions or to volunteer, contact Amy Mullen at 359-9532 or email destinationdowntowndover@gmail.com.

Rezac at Rock Shop

One of the artists featured on Mr. Bloodsworth’s show has been area favorite Jim Rezac.

Although he’s played guitar since he was a kid, he has only been writing songs for about seven or eight years. In that short

Jim Rezac will perform his original music Saturday night at the Rock Shop Performing Arts Center. (Submitted photo)

time, he has performed his original tunes at the Avalon Theater in Easton, Md., Wilmington’s Grand Opera House and The Bitter End in New York City.

Saturday night at 7, he will perform at B&B Music’s Rock Shop Performing Arts Center on U.S. 13 in Camden.

“I think the secret is to play at venues where the people are coming to hear what you have to say, not necessarily to hear their favorite tune that they’ve listened to on the way over.” Mr. Rezac said.

“And Kent County is teaming with enthusiastic and supportive patrons of folks that do what I like to do — thankfully for me. “

Mr. Rezac also teaches guitar and was approached by a student who heard his originals at a concert.

“Jessica (Ingham) asked if I’d be offended if she sang some harmonies for me at her next lesson. I laughed and told her what an honor it was,” he said.

“I mean my mom says she likes my stuff. But when a non-family member puts harmonies that she’s worked on for a week to your songs, well, that why we do this.”

He will be joined by Ms. Ingham as well as her sister, Savannah Georgia Laity. Bad JuJu’s Kenny Belmont will assist on bass.

Advance tickets for $10 are on sale at bnbrockshop.com or their Facebook page, Rock Shop Center for the Performing Arts. They will also be sold at the door for $12.

Dessert Theater

The cast members of Smyrna Opera House’s Dessert Theater production of “The House of Agatha Mystrie” are front row, from left, JaVon Garnett. Rebecca McLaughlin, Nancy Cubbage and John Levine. Back row, from left, is Dustin McHale, Trevor Smedley, Ashley Parks and Katherine Gibison. Missing is Austin Topper and Brett Moore. (Submitted photo)

The Smyrna Opera House at 7 W. South St. will present its annual Dessert Theater performance with “The House of Agatha Mystrie” on today and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m.

In the play, Ms. Mysteries, the famous and prolific mystery writer, gathers a group of the world’s finest (and most peculiar) detectives at her home for a weekend of rollicking and relaxation.

Her guests include Nancy Sketch, Sherlucky Holmes, Clues II, the Hardly Brothers (although they’re hardly brothers), and Rob Remington, private investigator. Once all together, Ms. Mystrie convinces them all to solemnly promise not to solve any mystery for two whole days. Everyone, though skeptical, complies. But when the body of a mysterious guest is found, everyone must decide whether to keep their promise.

Doors open 45 minutes prior to show time. A bar will be available for each performance. Attendees are invited to a dessert reception in the Dickinson Room following the performance, during which they can mingle with the cast.

Tickets are $16 general admission, $14 for SOH members, senior citizens, and military, $8 children 12 and under. Some content may not be considered appropriate for children. Attendance by children is at the discretion of parents. Tickets may be purchase in advance online at https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3326214, by calling 302-653-4236, or at the SOH Box Office. Tickets may also be purchased at the door.

Dover Symphony finale

The Dover Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Donald Buxton, will conclude its 2017-2018 season on Sunday, with its annual Pops Concert at 3 p.m. at Dover Downs’ Rollins Center.

The orchestra will perform a variety of selections with a Western theme, and to celebrate the end of its 50th concert season, it will conclude with a performance of Tschaikovsky’s 1812 Overture.

Valet parking will be available. Sweet treats will continue to be offered at a bake sale.

Admission prices are $20 for adults, $15 for seniors, students, military and first responders. Young people under 18 are free with a paying adult.

For ticket sales, visit www.doversymphony.org or call 302-270-1903. Tickets will also be sold at the door.

Now Showing

New this weekend in theaters is Marvel’s “Avengers: Infinity War” and the romantic drama “Kings.”

New on DVD and download starting Tuesday is the animated “Peter Rabbit” and the military film “12 Strong.”

Reach features editor Craig Horleman at chorl@newszap.com

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