Courts in Kent and Sussex counties announce convictions

DOVER — A 52-year-old Dover man was sentenced to five years after a 2018 crash that injured two pedestrians, the Delaware Department of Justice said Friday in a news release announcing several recent Superior Court convictions.

Following incarceration, William S. Smith will then serve six months of home confinement or work release, and then probation for a year. Smith pleaded guilty to two counts of first-degree vehicular assault and a count of possession of a deadly weapon during the commission of a felony.

Dover Police reported last August a 2013 Nissan Altima left the roadway in the area of U.S. 13 and West Denneys Road at approximately 7:14 p.m., struck two 17-year-old females in a crosswalk, hit a curb and then became disabled at an entrance of Delaware Technical Community College.

William S. Smith

At the time, police claimed Mr. Smith fled the scene and was located in a nearby parking lot.

The teens were taken to Bayhealth-Kent General Hospital in Dover and treated for non-life threatening injuries, Police said Smith was uninjured as were two 47-year-old passengers in his vehicle.

Deputy Attorney General Jason Cohee prosecuted the case, assisted by social worker Esther Powell. Delaware State Police Cpl. Stephen Douglas was the chief investigator.

• A bench trial ended with the conviction of a 27-year-old Frederica man on several weapons charges related to a May 2018 investigation.

Alex Durham was originally arrested in Dover after a 911 call hangup that brought officers to the area of 300 W. Division Street. A person had allegedly entered a residence, showed a firearm and then fled, according to authorities. The time of the offense was listed as 1:04 a.m.

Durham was located, fled on foot and was then taken into custody with the assistance of a K9 in the 200 block of West Division Street, police said. The DOJ said he pulled a gun from his waistband during the sequence. Police said a loaded 9mm handgun reported stolen was found nearby.

Convicted charges included possession of a firearm by a person prohibited, possession of ammunition by a person prohibited, carrying a concealed deadly weapon, resisting arrest and tampering with physical evidence.

An April sentencing is scheduled. The DOJ said Durham is a person prohibited from possessing a gun due to earlier felony convictions on weapons, reckless endangering and conspiracy charges.

DAG Lindsay Taylor prosecuted the case for the state.

• A 56-year-old Georgetown man received eight years in prison from a judge for threatening a person with a shotgun in July 2018.

According to the DOJ, Leerons Saab went to his home and returned to the scene of an argument turned physical with another man. One shot was fired in the air, and Saab pointed a weapon toward the man.

The defendant pleaded guilty to aggravated menacing and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony. Previous felony assault convictions factored into the sentencing, according to the DOJ. An 18-month probation term was ordered following release from prison.

DAG Kevin Gardner prosecuted the case for the state.

• After abusing his infant daughter and causing serious injuries, a 25-year-old Georgetown man was sentenced to a year in prison, the DOJ said.

Eduar Guzman-Cruz pleaded guilty to second-degree assault and two counts of endangering the welfare of a child.

According to authorities, Guzman-Cruz said his 3-month-old daughter wasn’t acting right upon arrival at the Nanticoke Memorial Hospital emergency room. The baby was found by medical staff to have a fractured skull, brain swelling and bleeding.

Following his prison stay, Guzman-Cruz will be on probation for three years.

DAG Michael Tipton prosecuted the case for the state, assisted by social worker Kerri Hovan and the DSP.

Reach staff writer Craig Anderson at canderson@newszap.com

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