Customs found two new types of imported pests at the Port of Wilmington in June

WILMINGTON — The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) confirmed Friday that two insects that U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agriculture specialists discovered in June were first ever discoveries of those species in the Port of Wilmington.

On June 4, CBP agriculture specialists intercepted an adult long-horned beetle in a container of cassava from Costa Rica that was destined to Port Washington, N.Y.

CBP preserved and submitted the pest to a USDA entomologist for identification.

The following day, the entomologist identified the insect as Ozodes multituberculatus Bates 1870 (Cerambycidae), a pest of Central America.

Long-horned beetles bore into wood and cause extensive damage to trees, particularly crop and lumber trees.
On June 11, CBP agriculture specialists intercepted an adult weevil in a container of pineapples from Guatemala that was destined to Wilmington.

CBP preserved and submitted the pest to a USDA entomologist for identification.
The following day, the entomologist identified the insect as Amalactus sp. (Curculionidae), a pest of Central and South America. Weevils pose a threat to a wide variety of foodstuffs, including grains and crops.

In both cases, the USDA directed the importer to fumigate the container.

“Customs and Border Protection’s agriculture protection mission is vital to our nation’s economic health, and these two first-in-port discoveries are evidence of our agriculture specialists’ tireless efforts to carry out that critical mission,” Casey Durst, CBP Director of Field Operations in Baltimore, said in a statement. “CBP remains steadfastly committed to ensuring our agriculture industries remain vibrant by intercepting invasive insects, noxious weeds, and animal diseases when we encounter them at our nation’s 328 international ports of entry.”

On a typical day nationally, specialists intercept 319 agriculture pests and 4,552 prohibited meat, plant materials or animal products in the United States, the agency noted.

Reach the Delaware State News newsroom at newsroom@newszap.com

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