Food options plentiful at Firefly Music Festival

Aimee Decicco, left, and Rosie Wenrich take advantage of the food choices and eat their lunch at the Firefly Music Festival. (Delaware State News/Marc Clery)

Aimee Decicco, left, and Rosie Wenrich take advantage of the food choices and eat their lunch at the Firefly Music Festival. (Delaware State News/Marc Clery)

DOVER — The Firefly Music Festival has been filled with stages and attractions to keep 90,000 people entertained throughout the four-day event.

Dozens of food and beverage stands with various menu options run along the borders of The Woodlands of Dover International Speedway to keep all of those stomachs satisfied.

Fans can easily get their hands on a cheeseburger or hot dog from one of the many American Grill stands. But they can also locate a veggie or gluten-free dish at several different food stands in the park.

Faith Lipford, a vegan from Oxford, Pennsylvania, said she had no trouble spotting a good place to eat.

“I was looking for the vegan symbol and I was able to find one pretty easily,” she said.

She ordered cold noodles from Doc Magrogan’s Oyster House, which is also located in Dover Downs.

Michaela Pearson from Dover said she didn’t expect to see Doc Magrogan’s at Firefly.

Mackenzie Malaspina and Nicholas Marquis snack on chips from local favorite Doc Magrogan’s Oyster House at Firefly.

Mackenzie Malaspina and Nicholas Marquis snack on chips from local favorite Doc Magrogan’s Oyster House at Firefly.

“I was really surprised to see they had local restaurants here,” she said. “They’re selling fish and chips and some seafood options for people, which is cool.”

Daniel Paco, a vegetarian from Manahawkin, New Jersey, enjoyed his veggie burrito bowl from Tex Mex City Friday afternoon.

“It’s actually really good, and I kind of wasn’t expecting that,” he said.

Kyle Davidson from Rehoboth Beach said he noticed healthy options on several different menus.

“I feel like every place I’ve gone to had a [vegan or vegetarian] option,” he said.

Mr. Davidson said the food options are decent, but the prices are a bit excessive.

“With some stuff, the price doesn’t necessarily match the quality,” he said. “But the options were better than last year.”

Firefly not only provides various options of foods, but also drinks.

Fans can pick up their Pepsi product and Bud Light beer from the various umbrella stands, but they have to grab their whiskey from the Jack Daniel’s truck parked across the Pavilion and Firefly Main Stage.

Adults can purchase whiskey and enjoy a free tour of the mobile distillery that demonstrates how their whiskey is prepared.

Krista Nuzum, who works with Jack Daniel’s, said it’s a way of bringing Lynchburg, Tennessee, the location of the Jack Daniel’s distillery, to Dover.

“We definitely want to bring people in, introduce them to the cocktail if they haven’t had it and let them enjoy the brand,” she said.

Sky Deswert from Philadelphia and Hannah Mix from Raleigh, North Carolina said it’s important to have a variety of selections at a festival like Firefly.

“It’s nice to have different options for people’s dietary needs,” Ms. Mix said.

“It’s nice that people from different cultures have access to their own food if that’s an option they want,” Ms. Deswert said.

They both work at the Coriander Market, an Indian food shack across from The Thicket. They said chicken masala and chana masala are the most popular items on the menu.

“The chana masala is regular potatoes, a sweet potato puree, and chick peas,” Ms. Mix said. “And the chicken masala is basically the chana masala with chicken.”

Ms. Deswert said healthy options are necessary at a festival.

“The veggie masala is vegetarian, and if you don’t include the rice, it can be gluten-free,” she said.

Emily Fries from Chicago said there are many different themes throughout the festival. She works at the German-themed food stand called Schnitzel Shack.

“We sell the chicken schnitzel; a breaded chicken breast with lettuce, onion and whole grain mustard, on a pretzel roll,” she said.

Ms. Fries said people expect more than burgers and fries when they attend a four-day festival like Firefly.

“Having a lot of different options kind of makes them feel like they’re at home and not just here for the day and eating whatever is provided for them,” she said.

Kristen Griffith is a freelance writer living in Dover.

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