Music fans adopt the ‘concert look’ at Firefly festival

Firefly Music Festival fashionistas, from left, are Gloriana Restrepo, Victoria Dortenzio, Claire O’Brien and Emily Bean, all from Connecticut. They said skin was in at the festival this year.  Delaware State News/Dave Chambers

Firefly Music Festival fashionistas, from left, are Gloriana Restrepo, Victoria Dortenzio, Claire O’Brien and Emily Bean, all from Connecticut. They said skin was in at the festival this year. Delaware State News/Dave Chambers

DOVER –– It wasn’t all about the music.

To get the perfect Firefly look, vendors were available on site all weekend to provide festival goers with the right fashions from head to toe.

Aarika Webb, a crafter from Dover made flower crowns and hair wraps for the Firefly ladies.

“They were just some easy projects to work on at home and I thought that they were things that would really appeal to the crowd here,” she said.

Flower crowns were one of the most popular accessories, adorned with flowers ranging from daisies to orchids.

The Philadelphia-based Barring Eye wear was on site selling their unique products.

The startup began in April 2014 and just started selling sunglasses eight months ago. The brand specializes in using innovative materials such as rosewood, zebrawood and black walnut.

“We make the finest frames in all kinds of cool styles and high end sunglasses are an industry that hasn’t been broken into,” Joe Hwang, co-founder and chief designer for Barring said. “We are here, making the best quality sunglasses but unlike other designers, we aren’t going for a 500 percent profit margin.”

The lower profit margin allows the company to sell premium sunglasses at only a fraction of the price as comparable brands.

Mr. Hwang and his business partners were design students at the University of Pennsylvania and after graduation decided to base their business in Philadelphia.

“It’s a shame that our school has produced so many famous designers but they all moved out of the area to New York or Los Angeles,” Mr. Hwang said. “Philadelphia is one of the oldest cities in the country and we want to make it a center of fashion.”

Barring has six retail locations and exclusively makes sunglasses now but is planning on expanding into prescription eye wear in the coming months.

Handcrafted jewelery options were provided by the Bohobo Collective, a dual coast business founded by two sisters in Virginia Beach and San Francisco.

“We’ve been doing this for about four years now and this is our second Firefly,” Christina Clark, co-owner from Virginia Beach said.

She and her sister Elizabeth MacFarlane create each item for sale ranging from earrings to body chains.

“There’s a great lineup here and it’s a festival that provides a good opportunity for us to sell our work,” Ms. Clark said.

And lastly, people in need of comfortable, fashionable shoes could visit the tent of Austin-based Teysha Social Enterprises. The company offers slip ons and boots, all hand made in Guatemala.

Kristin Eberts of Columbus, Ohio, offered plenty of custom-made Teysha shoes for sale at Firefly on Saturday.  (Delaware State News/Dave Chambers)

Kristin Eberts of Columbus, Ohio, offered plenty of custom-made Teysha shoes for sale at Firefly on Saturday. (Delaware State News/Dave Chambers)

The company has two retail locations –– Austin and Manhattan but a crew goes across the country selling the shoes at music festivals all summer long.

“We have plenty of options to choose from here, but we also offer our customers to get involved in the design process and they can customize their boots starting with the kind of leather, outside and inside fabrics,” Kristin Eberts, a Teysha saleswoman said. “Our crafters in Guatemala can then use all their handmade fabrics and make the shoes you want.”

Although many vendors were on site, lots of Fireflies came well prepared in festival fashion.

A group of four girls hailing from Connecticut were among the first through the gates Saturday, all sporting shorts, crop tops and Converse sneakers.

“Honestly, I’m trying to be as close to naked as possible while still looking appropriate,” Glorianna Restrepo said.

“It’s true, it’s just so hot and everyone is sweaty and close together, we wanted to wear clothes that wouldn’t be too hot,” Victoria Dortenzio said.

Ryan Bowman of Massachusetts was also early to the festival, wearing orange shorts, orange glasses and a tie dye tank top.

“I probably wouldn’t wear this on a regular day, but I like tie dye and I think it’s perfect to wear to any music festival,” he said.

A pair of girls, Meghan MacDonald and Sydney Davis, went shopping especially for the festival.

“A lot of stores now even have a festival section with the kind of hippie prints and it’s more of a rebellious atmosphere so these are styles we will probably only wear here,” Ms. Davis said.

As for footwear, almost any style imaginable was on display at the festival ranging from combat boots to no shoes at all.

Many people had to change their footwear plans after experiencing the muddy conditions on Thursday.

“I just kind of threw my outfit together and wore sandals the other day but it was so muddy and with all the walking, my feet aren’t thanking me,” Natasha Ulrich of Point Pleasant, N.J. said.

The girls from Massachusetts also had a change of plans, all originally planning on sandals but switching to Converses once they found out about the muck they’d be treading through for the rest of the weekend.

No matter what you wear to Firefly, the main theme was comfort –– protecting yourself from the heat and muddy or blistered toes. Another accessory many didn’t leave their tent without was sunscreen. Those who didn’t use sun protection were sporting their tan lines from Friday’s outfit.

Reach staff writer Ashton Brown at abrown@newszap.com. Follow @AshtonReports on Twitter.

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