Ranji sworn in for first term as Family Court of Del. judge

WILMINGTON — Judge Jennifer Ranji was sworn in for her first term as a judge of the Family Court of Delaware Tuesday at the New Castle County Courthouse in Wilmington.

Family Court Chief Judge Michael K. Newell welcomed the audience to the investiture and the invocation was given by Judge Ranji’s father Leon F. Barber and her sons, Logan and Jordan Ranji, led the Pledge of Allegiance

Thomas P. McGonigle administered the oath of office as Viraf Ranji, Judge Ranji’s husband, held the Bible.

Judge Ranji, 48, replaces Judge William L. Chapman Jr., who left the bench earlier this year to return to private practice.

Gov. Jack A. Markell, Attorney General Matt Denn and Senate President Pro Tem Patricia M. Blevins spoke, as did Judge Ranji’s sister, Peggy Cipparone.

Previously, Judge Ranji served as the secretary of the Department of Services for Children, Youth and their Families.

Judge Ranji, of Wilmington, also had served earlier as an educational policy adviser to Gov. Markell from 2009 to 2012 and also served as deputy legal counsel to then Gov. Thomas Carper and as director of Legal Affairs for Family Court.

In private practice, Judge Ranji frequently appeared in Family Court and provided pro bono representation to domestic violence victims through Delaware Volunteer Legal Services and to child abuse victims through the Office of the Child Advocate.

She received her bachelor of arts from Rutgers University in 1991 and earned her law degree in 1995 from Widener University School of Law. She is a former chairwoman of the Women and the Law Section of the Delaware State Bar Association, the Delaware Child Protection Accountability Commission and the Governor’s Synar Advisory Committee.

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