Satellite image shows storm that hammered Delaware

NOAA satellite image

For a look at how massive the winter storm that hit Delaware Wednesday and Thursday, this Geocolor image from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) GOES-16 satellite captures it off the East coast Thursday.

The powerful nor’easter has impacted coastal areas from Florida to Maine.

“Notice the long line of clouds stretching over a thousand miles south of the storm, which is drawing moisture all the way from deep in the Caribbean,” NOAA stated on a web page Thursday.

NOAA explains that Geocolor is a multispectral product composed of True Color (using a simulated green component) during the daytime, and an Infrared product that uses bands 7 and 13 at night. During the day, the imagery looks approximately as it would appear when viewed with human eyes from space, said NOAA.

According to the Associated Press, the storm threatened to dump as much as 18 inches of snow from the Carolinas to Maine and unleashing hurricane-force winds and flooding that closed schools and offices and halted transportation systems.

In Delaware, Sussex County was hit the hardest with 10 to 11 inches falling in some areas.

Forecasters say the storm will be followed immediately by a blast of face-stinging cold air that could break records in more than two dozen cities and bring wind chills as low as minus 40 degrees this weekend.

 

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