UD to allow extra credit hours at no charge

ud logo by . DOVER — The University of Delaware recently announced it will no longer charge extra fees for students taking more than 17 credits.
The change, university officials said, is aimed at helping students graduate within four years.

“This will make a significant difference for students who need a sixth course in a semester to catch up and graduate within four years,” Provost Robin W. Morgan said in a statement. “We expect this change to be particularly beneficial to first-generation, low-income students.”

Previously, students could take 12 to 17 credits per semester for the same cost but would pay more for any credit hours beyond that.

Officials recommended the new policy to the board of trustees by citing evidence that more credit hours covered by full tuition leads to students taking more credits. Kent State University, for instance, raised the maximum number of credit hours covered under full tuition from 16 to 18, resulting in a 5 percent increase in students taking 17 or 18 credits, according to UD.

Students need 120 credits to graduate from the University of Delaware. However, some must take non-credit courses, like remedial sessions, or repeat a class, which can cause them to fall behind.

The university has begun placing a greater emphasis on increasing the four-year graduation rate, and to that end, the percentage of first-year bachelor’s degree students who completed at least 30 credits increased from 58 percent in 2016-17 to 61 percent during the 2017-18 academic year.

“Clearly, our students are benefiting from our efforts to help them finish in four,” Dr. Morgan said. “By increasing the credit hours covered under full tuition, we will further help their chances of graduating on time and at a lower cost to them.”

The university in February announced it planned to increase tuition and create new fees for nursing, business and engineering majors.

Staff writer Matt Bittle can be reached at 741-8250 or mbittle@newszap.com. Follow @MatthewCBittle on Twitter.

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