Faulty judgement reason for abolishing death penalty

Once again, the Bible has been put into play to support someone’s opinion on a civil situation. Ms. Lofland [“We can’t ‘fix’ the death penalty,” Letters to the Editor, March 22] specifically refers to the quote from the Ten Commandments “Thou shall not kill.”

A study of the original language would tell her that the word “kill” should actually be translated “murder.” Murder is the act of killing with malice.

Perhaps she should also have quoted the Old Testament verses that state certain actions against others demand the taking of the life of the perpetrator.

She is correct in her statement that death penalties do cost more to the state than life sentences. However, if cost is the factor on which we make decisions, maybe an immediate carrying out of the execution, as in the Old West, is the answer.

It is my opinion that the death penalty should be taken out of the justice system, not because of cost or misquoted Scripture, but because so many misjudged cases have been proven wrong by more modern, accurate post-case science.

I would also suggest that the choosing of potential jury members should be on a basis of knowledge, not on who can be there. It is my opinion that most “peers” do not have the time, knowledge or thinking capacity to mull over the plethora of evidence, and especially lawyers’ opinions and suppositions, to determine an educated verdict.

I have always wondered how trials would go if the lawyers also had to swear to tell the truth and nothing but. I find it interesting that they are the only ones in a trial that aren’t forced to so swear. Hmmm.

M. Bryan Rice
Milford

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