Letter to the Editor: Getting a charge out of electric vehicles

Your letter writer James Webster, May 10 “A few more words on electric vehicles,” had some good points to make about electric vehicles and charging. Yes, it is great that there are more and more public chargers, either fast or very fast. Most of them provide free electricity, like at retail shopping malls. Beat that with your gasoline car.

But the most frequent way that we electric vehicle (EV) owners use to charge up is at home. At our home, we used a simple electric extension cord to charge up our car’s battery overnight. Others use a standard plug at work, if the boss says OK, as is often the case, as every EV owners offers to pay for the electricity.

My friend, Dan, charges up overnight with a standard 120 volt (lamp socket) plug at this home, drives 40 miles to work in Dover, plugs in at work, gets a full charge on the 120 volt plug. Eight hours later, his 40-miles range Volt, battery and gasoline plug in hybrid, is full. So he gets to work and back all on electricity and hardly ever uses his gasoline engine, or gasoline.

Since electricity is cheap, about one-third to one-fourth the cost of gasoline, mile for mile, his charge at work costs only $1. That’s $20 per month to commute to work. Terrific! And I can drive from Rehoboth Beach to Wilmington and back without ever stopping to charge up, since I have a 250-mile range on my EV. Most people don’t need public charging stations unless they are going a really long distance. Most driving is within 30 to 40 miles of your home. So, charge at home, and, if you have solar panels on the roof of your house, as I do, you can be “running on sunshine”.

Mr. Webster is correct that EV owners don’t just buy or lease EVs for the cost savings. They do so because these are cars of the future, here now. Our kids will be proud of us for not polluting the Earth with oil spills in the oceans, smog and climate changing gases that threaten our health and our sea level rise. EVs also keep our money out of the oily hands of dictatorial countries that sell us and other nations’ oil.

Charlie Garlow
Rehoboth Beach

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