Letter to the Editor: On the Confederate flag flap

Recently, some of our righteous state politicians couldn’t help themselves and took to declaring their outrage at the Georgetown Historical Society, which allows a southern heritage group to display a Confederate battle flag on their property. These elected social justice warriors huffed and they puffed and took away funding from the society so, presumably, everyone would know they are against slavery — which ended over 150 years ago.

Strangely, the posturing politicians didn’t have similar harsh words or actions against the blue and gold state flag of Delaware that flies beside the Stars and Bars down there. That flag represents a state that was far more accepting of slavery and states rights than we might like to admit.

Delaware was one of five slave states which remained in the Union but many of our citizens joined the southern cause during the Civil War. Even after the war ended in April-May of 1865, it took the 13th Amendment to actually end slavery in the U.S.

That wasn’t ratified by enough states until December 1865 after which it became the law of the land. Even then there were four states which refused to ratify — Mississippi, Kentucky, New Jersey and (wait for it…) Delaware. In fact, it wasn’t until 1901 that our stubborn little state voted to ratify the 13th even though slavery was ancient history by then.

So, while our ‘woke’ legislators primp and preen for their voters, they come to work at Leg Hall which flies the flag of a state with its own challenging history regarding slavery.

Isn’t it time to accept the facts, flags and monuments of our country’s imperfect and unalterable past and get on with the business of improving what’s happening in the 21st century? Picking the scabs on history doesn’t make us better off today and the fact we elect people who think so is sad.

Jim Melville
Kenton

You are encouraged to leave relevant comments but engaging in personal attacks, threats, online bullying or commercial spam will not be allowed. All comments should remain within the bounds of fair play and civility. (You can disagree with others courteously, without being disagreeable.) Feel free to express yourself but keep an open mind toward finding value in what others say. To report abuse or spam, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box.

Facebook Comment