SOUND OFF DELAWARE: Casino legislation

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The Senate passed legislation Saturday that will give Delaware’s casinos a long-awaited tax break. By a 17-3 vote, with one member abstaining, the chamber sent to the governor a bill that will take $16.8 million in revenue away from the state government in perpetuity but will, supporters hope, reverse the situation for Delaware’s struggling gaming establishments.

• So we bail out the casinos again but not increase pay for state workers like probation officers that live at the poverty line if they have kids, nice. — Tara Rahe

• How is it a bailout when the state reduces its take? I think the casinos have been bailing out the state for years. And the state increased their take significantly over the years, taking, taking, taking. — Bruce Anderson

• It’s not a bailout. It’s a tax break. It’s either that or the casino goes under and the state gets zero percent (meaning they lose $150 million in revenue), 1,000-plus jobs are lost and a huge chunk of tourism is lost. — Sarah Ottinger Bradley

• Because gambling’s not an addiction, right? Gambling doesn’t ruin lives, right? We throw lifelines to an addiction while shooting down a non-addictive plant that would bring in billions more tax revenue than any slot machine or craps table! — Rick Reed

• No where could a business like Dover Downs could survive with the state taking over 40 percent of their income. — Deborah Wilkerson Mitchell

• Let the casinos go under. If a business is failing, and the casinos are they become a burden on the state. Knew they were a bad idea from the start. — Jason Rextc

• Most business’ would fail if taxed at 40% of the revenue. That is robbery. — Sam Fish

• It used to be a tourist spot when other states did not have casinos. Not so much now. If the casinos cannot financially make ends meet, then they need to reinvent themselves into something else. When the horse racing industry in Delaware was having trouble, the casinos were built at the racetracks to help save it. That was creative and it worked. Now, years later, another creative idea is needed to help save the casinos. The last time the casinos were short of money and the state gave them a break, the situation did not improve. — Michael Pearson

• Nobody took anything from state government. Government is just taking less from a private business. No way this is a bailout. Casinos pay much more in taxes than any other business. The state raised the tax over and over during the good years. Now that there is more competition they are struggling. How about they pay the same tax rate as any other business? That’s fair right? — Michael Riemann

• Exactly. If we tax them less, they can expand and multiply, providing more tax sources. — Chris Behrens

• Can’t legalize weed, but can continue bailing out casinos. Makes sense. — Charles Wolfe

• Right, why lead on an industry proving itself everyday? Let’s latch onto a dying horse and buggy who refuses to change. — Tyler Mock

• Will helping Delaware’s struggling Gaming Industry benefit struggling Delaware citizens? — Peter Servon

• Now hopefully the hard-working employees will see a suitable raise in pay! — Dennis Orlando Jr.

• But they won’t. Because it will go to incentivizing conferences to be located there, building upgrades and amenities. Actual employees aren’t likely to see a dime. But aren’t we all glad certain senators refused to vote on a minimum wage raise because this bill hadn’t passed? Now this passed and minimum wage earners are still struggling to survive! Yayyyyyy. — Danielle Levredge

• The house always wins. — Daniel Samsel

• Another bit of legislation that benefits one business. — Elle Lee

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