6.2-pound flounder is a tourney winner

Saturday was the Paradise Marina’s second annual Bay Flounder tournament.

Two Hundred and seventy-four anglers fished for first place worth $500. Anglers showed up at the marina to sign in at seven in the morning. Five dollars of every entry fee was donated to the Boys and Girls club in Oak Orchard.

The tournament raised $1,365 that should help the Boys and Girls club out with some of their needs.

The tournament boundaries were the Rehoboth and Indian River bays and no one was allowed beyond the Charles W Cullen bridge.

The scales opened at four in the afternoon. All lines had to be out of the water by five and the scales closed at six that evening.

The first flounder weighed in were in the two-pound range and in no time we had a full board, and the ladies were dominating the tournament. As more boats came in a lot of fish were brought to the scales.

Nathan Mitchell had a winning 6.2-pound flounder. (Submitted photo)

When a fish scored and took a place on the board the crowd would go nuts and cheer.

It is always fun to be at the weigh ins for a tournament. The Flounder Pounder Open in August will be even more exciting. This bay tournament was a warm up for that event.

Nathan Mitchell came to the table with a cooler on his shoulders. I kept thinking he must have a lot of fish in there or some really big ones. Each angler can only enter one fish, so he had to choose the fish he wanted to enter. When he emptied the cooler on the table this beast of a flounder was pulled out last. It measured 25 inches and topped the scales at six pounds, two ounces.

The crowd went nuts, this was the biggest flounder yet and the day wasn’t over.

The next group to the table had a few nice flounder and one respectable sized weakfish for what we see these days. At that point all I wanted to know was where did you get the weakfish, good to see that size fish is in the inland bays.

Paradise Marina’s Bay Flounder Tournament winners were, Jerry Petrucci, Nathan Mitchell, and Luke Horney. (Submitted photo)

There were 15 minutes until the scales would close when Jerry Petrucci put his flounder on the table.

It measured 22 1/2 inches and weighed in at four pounds and five ounces. Jerry went nuts, he knew he just nailed second place. Next up was his buddy Luke Horney, his fish measured out at 21 3/4 inches, topping the scales at three pounds eight ounces. He had to beat three pounds four ounces, a number all anglers were trying to hit for two hours.

The whole crew went nuts, all anglers were in and the scales would close in five minutes. We had our winners.

There was an awards ceremony with some really big checks not just in money but size and some beautiful trophies.

The check and trophy for Nathan Mitchell was so big I couldn’t get the whole thing in the frame of a picture. Luke and Jerry’s crew hosed the stage down with champagne. Great day at the second annual Paradise Marina Bay Flounder Tournament.

Up next is the 2017 Flounder Pounder Open in August with a top prize of $100,000 at Paradise Marina.

See you there!

Surprises

Fishing has been decent for the summer with an abundance of surprises catches. Tautog season started and many anglers boated more trigger than tautog.

This year trigger is no longer a by catch of tautog fishing you can actually target them, they are all over the place. Small hooks with clam is the best set up. We are using Diamond State Custom tackle top and bottom rigs, the sharp Owner hooks work well on triggers.

Offshore anglers are finally into the blue fin tuna bite, and yellow fin is still hot mostly on the chunk. A swordfish was caught near the hambone.

Freshwater action continues to be great for many anglers and the top water bite is a lot of fun. The afternoon bite is tough unless you are fishing the shaded deeper areas.

Rich King’s outdoors column appears Thursdays in the Delaware State News.

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