Two-year ‘Duck Hunt’ investigation nets over 116K bags of heroin in Kent, Sussex

Pictured is evidence seized after a two-year investigation into an alleged large scale heroin distribution and money laundering operation in Kent and Sussex counties. (Submitted photo/Delaware Law Enforcement)

Pictured is evidence seized after a two-year investigation into an alleged large-scale heroin distribution and money laundering operation in Kent and Sussex counties. (Submitted photo/Delaware Law Enforcement)

DOWNSTATE — On Tuesday, authorities announced 13 arrests in connection with a two-year investigation into an alleged large-scale heroin distribution and money laundering operation.

The total heroin seizure for the overall investigation was 116,675 bags or approximately 1,749 grams of heroin with a street value of $1,166,750.

On May 11, the execution of seven search warrants netted 74,425 bags of heroin weighing approximately 1,116 grams, which authorities said was one of the largest single seizures of pre-packaged heroin in state history. The street value of the drugs was $740,000.

Also seized was:

• $200,000 including cash and seized assets from numerous accounts

• Approximately $50,000 in jewelry

• 3 Ruger 9mm handguns

• A Raven Arms .25mm handgun

• A M4 Carbine Rifle

The overall investigation involving 13 agencies was dubbed Operation “Duck Hunt.”

Last week members of the Delaware State Police Sussex Drug Unit, Division of Gaming Enforcement, and the Sussex County Attorney General’s Office concluded the investigation.

The following additional special units within the Delaware State Police participated: Sussex, Kent and New Castle County Drug Units; Sussex, Kent, and New Castle County Governor’s Task Force Units, Intelligence Unit, Special Operations Response Team.

Federal participating agencies that assisted with the investigation include, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement Administration, United States Homeland Security Investigations Unit and the National Guard Counter Drug Task Force.

Local law enforcement participating agencies include Department of Correction, Probation and Parole, Georgetown Police Department, Seaford PD, Smyrna PD, Dover PD, Delaware Alcohol and Tobacco Enforcement, Delaware Division of Revenue Criminal Investigative Unit, Dover Downs Casino and Surveillance Unit.

According to authorities, investigation revealed Deangelo Mcglotten was the alleged ring leader for the heroin distribution into Kent and Sussex counties along with his closest associates, Timothy Felix and Adrian Coverdale.

In addition to the heroin distribution network, the investigation revealed the illegal proceeds of the drug organization were being laundered by Salman Choudhary through casinos, businesses, and personal properties, authorities said. Eleven suspects were indicted by the Sussex County Grand Jury as part of the investigation.

Throughout Kent, Sussex

The arrest operation was initiated with seven search and seizure warrants being executed throughout Kent and Sussex counties by the Delaware State Police Special Operations Response Team, the Federal Bureau of Investigation SWAT, and the additional above units of the Delaware State Police.

According to authorities, the operation disrupted the flow of heroin into the communities of Kent and Sussex counties. The organization allegedly supplied several drug markets in Sussex County including Chandler Heights, Meadowbridge, Coverdale, and Oak Orchard.

In total, 13 suspects were charged with 77 criminal offenses as part of the overall investigation.

Search warrants were executed on two separate occasions during the investigation. On Jan. 13 a search and seizure warrant was executed at Mr. Mcglotten’s residence, located in the 16000 block of Progress School Road, Bridgeville. Another was executed on an Acura MDX linked to Mcglotten.

The following evidence was seized as part of the Jan. 13 investigation:

• 42,250 bags of heroin or approximately 633 grams of heroin

Deangelo Mcglotten

Deangelo Mcglotten

• $7,740

• A stolen 9 mm handgun

• A Marlin 30-30 rifle

On May 11, seven search and seizure warrants were executed at the following locations:

• 2000 block of Woodyard Road, Harrington

• 12000 block of Beach Highway, Greenwood

• 16000 block of Progress School Road, Bridgeville

• 300 block of James Street, Georgetown

• 400 block of Central Park Drive, Harrington

• 400 block of South Washington Street, Milford

• 200 block of Aspen Drive, Cheswold

The following evidence was seized during the final arrest operation where seven search warrants were executed on May 11:

• 74,425 bags of heroin or approximately 1,116 grams of heroin

• $200,000 was seized which includes cash and seized assets from numerous accounts

• Approximately $50,000 in jewelry

• Three Ruger 9mm handguns

• A Raven Arms .25mm handgun

• A M4 Carbine Rifle

• 23 vehicles total value approximately $250,000

Sussex County indictments

Following lists the names of the persons identified as part of the organization who were indicted by the Sussex County Grand Jury:

Mr. Mcglotten, 31, of Felton – Manufactures, delivers, PWID a controlled substance in Tier 4 quantity, possesses a controlled substance in a Tier 5 quantity, second-degree criminal solicitation, second degree conspiracy, four counts of money laundering, organized crime and racketeering, fraud and false statements makes and subscribes a false return statement document, possess, purchase, own or control a firearm/destructive weapon if previously convicted, possess, purchase own control firearm, ammo by person prohibited prior violent crime or felony, manufactures, delivers, PWID a controlled substance in Tier 4 quantity, possess a controlled substance in a Tier 5 Quantity, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, receiving a stolen firearm. He was committed to the DOC in default of $1,000,000 cash bond.

Patrick Cirwithian, 30, of Greenwood – maintaining a drug property, second-degree conspiracy, organized crime and racketeering He was committed in default of $350,000 cash bond.

Salman Choudhary

Salman Choudhary

Adrian Coverdale, 34, of Blades – manufactures, delivers, PWID a controlled substance in Tier 4 quantity, possesses a controlled substance in a Tier 5 quantity, second-degree criminal solicitation, second-degree conspiracy, money laundering, organized crime and racketeering. He was committed in default of $400,000 cash bond.

Timothy Felix, 30, of Dover – manufactures, delivers, PWID a controlled substance in Tier 4 quantity, possesses a controlled substance in a Tier 5 quantity, two counts of drug dealing, second-degree criminal solicitation, second-degree conspiracy, money laundering, organized crime and racketeering. He was committed in default of $750,000 cash bond.

Tina Mosley, 51, of Greenwood – maintaining drug property, second-degree conspiracy, organized crime and racketeering. She was committed in default of $750,000 cash bond.

Salman Choudhary, 37, of Georgetown – organized crime and racketeering, three counts of money laundering, two counts of attempt to evade or defeat tax, and two counts of failure to file return. He was committed in default of $1.7 million cash bond.

The following persons were charged and arraigned by Justice of the Peace Court:

Daniel Montalvo-Rosado, 29, of Wilmington – manufactures, delivers, PWID a controlled substance in Tier 4 quantity, possesses a controlled substance in a Tier 5 quantity and second-degree conspiracy. He was committed in default of $200,000 cash bond.

Christian Cortes, 27, of Wilmington – operate unregistered motor vehicle, no valid license, fail trans T/R and no insurance. He was committed in default of $200,000 cash bond.

Some still sought

The following suspects were indicted by the Sussex County Grand Jury in connection with this investigation have not been located at time of the news release:

Linda Mcglotten, 49, of Milford – racketeering and money laundering.

Reginald Mcglotten, 30, of Millsboro – manufactures, delivers, PWID a controlled substance in Tier 4 quantity, possesses a controlled substance in a Tier 5 quantity, second-degree criminal solicitation, second-conspiracy, money laundering, organized crime and racketeering.

Obrien Morris, 26, of Millsboro – manufactures, delivers, PWID a controlled substance in Tier 4 quantity, possesses a controlled substance in a Tier 5 quantity, two counts of second-degree criminal solicitation, second-degree conspiracy, money laundering, organized crime and racketeering.

Luis Manzanet-Garlaza, 27, of Milford – manufactures, delivers, PWID a controlled substance in Tier 4 quantity, second-degree conspiracy, organized crime and racketeering.

Sohail Zeeshan, 39, of Rehoboth Beach – organized crime and racketeering, three counts of money laundering, two counts of fraud and false statement makes and subscribes a false return statement document.

Mr. Manzanet-Garlaza has ties to Milford, Delaware, Northern New Jersey, Florida, and Puerto Rico. Delaware State Police are requesting any information that may lead to the location and arrest of these persons.

Police asked anyone with information on the location of the listed wanted persons to contact Sgt. M. Dawson at 752-3815. Information may also be provided by calling Delaware Crime Stoppers at 1-800-TIP-3333, online at www.delaware.crimestoppersweb.com or by sending an anonymous tip by text to 274637 (CRIMES) using the keyword “DSP.”

Statements from officials

“Heroin is a serious, serious problem in Delaware right now and all of law enforcement is working together to combat it,” said Attorney General Matt Denn.

“This operation puts a significant dent in the heroin traffic in the southern part of the state and is another example of how the close working relationship between our office and Delaware State Police, as well as other agencies, can make a difference and make Delaware a safer place.

“Along with the Delaware State Police who worked diligently on this case, I would also recognize Deputy Attorneys General Rebecca Anderson, Christopher Hutchison, Michael Tipton, and Adam Gelof for leading the DOJ side of this very complicated and noteworthy investigation, and I thank State Prosecutor Kathy Jennings, and Chief Sussex County Prosecutor Peggy Marshall for their leadership in this important case.”

“This investigation targeted a criminal organization responsible for large scale heroin distribution and money laundering in Kent and Sussex County,” Delaware State Police Superintendent Col. Nathaniel J. McQueen Jr. said.

“The presence of drugs and drug dealers in our communities invariably leads to an increase in crimes such as robberies and thefts and has a significant impact on the health and safety of our communities. The success of this drug investigation would not have been realized if it were not for the cooperation between all of the agencies involved.

“The large amount of drugs seized and the drug traffickers that were arrested would have continued to plague our communities. Thank you to all of our Troopers all of the Federal, State and local agencies and the Department of Justice for their excellent teamwork and collaboration on this investigation. All of our agencies remain committed to working with our communities to reduce violent crime and drug trafficking throughout the state of Delaware.”

“The results were only possible with everyone providing information and support,” Director of the Division of Gaming Enforcement Greg Nolt said.

“It began as a possible money laundering case and evolved into one of the largest heroin seizures in state along with other asset seizures throughout Sussex County to include money, property and guns. The success of this operation was only possible with the full commitment of all our partners in law enforcement along with those in public and private sector.

“Thank you to everyone who assisted our efforts to reduce the impact that heroin has on our communities and remove violent criminals from our streets.”

Reach the Delaware State News newsroom at newsroom@newszap.com

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