Cape Henlopen falls to Salesianum 13-5 in boys lacrosse title game

DOVER — Just two goals separated Cape Henlopen High and Salesianum the last time they played.

And the Vikings had some history of standing up to the Sals in state championship games.

But second-seeded Sallies was more than up to the challenge on Saturday afternoon, netting the contest’s first three goals before putting away a 13-5 victory over No. 4 Cape in the DIAA boys’ lacrosse state championship game at Dover High.

The Vikings (14-5), who lost to the Sals (15-3) only 10-8 on May 12, were able to stay within striking range of Sallies for a while. Finally, though, the Sals tallied the game’s final four goals to wrap up the program’s ninth state crown.

It was the eighth state championhip in the past 11 seasons under coach Bob Healy, the Dover resident and Capital School District teacher.

Gregory Boyce of Cape Henlopen is congratulated by his teammates after scoring a goal against Salesianum. Special to The Delaware State News/Gary Emeigh

“Cape’s always had a great team,” said Healy. “They’re well-coached, they’ve got tough kids. It’s always really a battle.

“I thought we played smart today. We hustled. We made good decisions, we picked up groundballs. We did a lot of the little things that really led to the win. And we had each other’s backs. I think that was the biggest thing.”

Jacob Brown of Cape Henlopen takes a shot that was blocked by Salesianum goalie Brady Emmi. Special to The Delaware State News/Gary Emeigh

Cape is the last Delaware school to beat Sallies, knocking off the Sals in the 2014 state finals. The Vikings were 2-1 in title games against Sallies, which was playing in the finals for the 11th straight year.

After falling behind 3-0, Cape closed within 5-3 on a goal from Greg Boyce with 6:52 left in the second quarter. But the Sals followed with three unanswered goals to take an 8-3 advantage into halftime.

The Vikings then got back within 9-5 on a goal from Brock Maloomian with 4:39 remaining in the third quarter. But Sallies shut them out the rest of the way.
The five goals matched a season-low for Cape.

“We made a couple mistakes early that gave them fastbreaks — which was similar to the last game,” said Vikings’ coach Mark D’Ambrogi. “Beyond that, I thought we had some opportunities we didn’t capitalize on. It was a little bit a steamtroll effect where we didn’t capitalize and they did. That let them get the momentum.

Viking sophomore Gregory Boyce scores a first quarter goal in DIAA championship game Saturday against Salesianum. Special to The Delaware State News/Gary Emeigh

“They’re a complete team. They’re a good team. We’re a good team but I don’t think you saw our best effort. We handled ourselves in a dignified and sportsmanlike manner and for that I’m very proud.”      Maloomian tallied three of Cape’s goals with Boye and Erik-Stephane Stancofski scoring the others. Goalie Brendan Kane made eight saves for the Vikings as both squads took 28 shots.

Sallies’ goalie Brady Emmi had 10 saves, including a couple stops on point-blank shots. Cooper Urban and Bradley Santore netted three goals apiece to lead the Sals.

Under Healy and assistant coach Shawn Plews, another Dover resident and teacher, Sallies has grown into a regional program. The Sals played only three Delaware teams during the regular season, facing squads from Pennslyvania, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Connecticut and Canada.

But Healy said the Sals never consider it easy to claim another state title. On Saturday, Sallies lost probably its best defender, Jimmy Blaszkow, to a foot injury early in the game.

Healy said all season the Sals just tried to go back to their blue-rollar roots.

“They’re young guys and they don’t really know where we were in ‘06 to where we are now,” he said. “Our schedule prepared us for this game today, without a doubt. The guys were ready. They were fired up today.”

Reach sports editor Andy Walter at walter@newszap.com

You are encouraged to leave relevant comments but engaging in personal attacks, threats, online bullying or commercial spam will not be allowed. All comments should remain within the bounds of fair play and civility. (You can disagree with others courteously, without being disagreeable.) Feel free to express yourself but keep an open mind toward finding value in what others say. To report abuse or spam, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box.