Hens hire Towson’s Ambrose, former UD player Cubit to football staff

NEWARK – Delaware coach Danny Rocco found his new offensive coordinator at CAA rival Towson.

Jared Ambrose, who has been the Tigers’ OC for the past seven seasons, will take over as the Blue Hens’ offensive coordinator, Rocco announced on Thursday morning.

Rocco is also bringing in former Blue Hen player and veteran coach Bill Cubit as assistant head coach/running backs coach. With the additions, assistant coach Alex Wood will shift over and mentor the wide receivers.

Ambrose had previously served as a graduate assistant for the Blue Hens in 2007 and 2008.

Danny Rocco is 14-9 with one playoff appearance in his first two seasons as Delaware’s head coach. Delaware sports information/Mark Campbell

“We’re extremely excited to announce the hiring of both Jared Ambrose and Bill Cubit to our coaching staff here at the University of Delaware,” Rocco said in a press release. “We recognized both of these coaches to be outstanding additions to our program. Both coaches met a long list of criteria that was put in place when we started our search.”

Ambrose returns to Newark after spending the past 10 seasons as part of his brother Rob’s staff at Towson, including the past seven as the offensive coordinator. During his time with the Tigers, he was a part of three FCS Playoff appearances, including a run to the 2013 National Championship game.

He has coached two CAA Offensive Players of the Year, including this past year when Tom Flacco took home the honor. Last year, Towson led the league in scoring (34.5 ppg) and total offense (465.0 ypg).

In addition to Flacco, he also coached Terrance West, who saw time in the NFL and was the runner up for the Walter Payton Award in 2013.

During Ambrose’s previous stint with Delaware, he worked with the offense, which was led by All-American and Super Bowl champion Joe Flacco. His coaching career began with a three-year stint as a student assistant coach at NCAA II Shepherd, leading the team to a 29-5 record and three straight undefeated West Virginia Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championships.

“Coming back to Delaware has always been a goal for my wife and I,” Ambrose said in a statement. “The first time we were here, we quickly understood that the community and fans bleed Delaware blue and gold.

“This is a humbling honor to work for such a historic program and two well-respected individuals in Coach Rocco and (athletic director) Chrissi Rawak. I can’t wait to help bring national titles back to Newark.”

Cubit returns to Newark, where he was a standout QB turned All-American split end for the Blue Hens, playing for Tubby Raymond in 1973 and 1974. In those two years, Cubit was a part of a team that went 20-6 and took home the Lambert Cup twice, two NCAA playoff appearances and a national championship runner-up in 1974.

He brings a long history of coaching experience, including success at nearby NCAA Division III Widener, where he led teams to a five-year record of 34-18-1, two conference titles and two NCAA appearances.

“It is truly an honor and privilege to join this talented coaching staff,” said Cubit. “As a proud alumnus, I look forward to coaching at this prestigious University and working with these outstanding student-athletes at Delaware,” Cubit said. “I’m incredibly grateful to Coach Rocco and Chrissi (Rawak) for this opportunity.”

His journey then took him to an eight-year tenure at Western Michigan where he posted 51 wins and three bowl games, while also being named MAC Coach of the Year honors in 2005.

In total, Cubit brings 14 years of head coaching experience with a combined record of 90-72-1, including a stint at Big Ten member Illinois in 2015.

Cubit also spent time as the offensive coordinator at Western Michigan, Illinois, Stanford, Missouri and Rutgers during his career.

 

 

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